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Nagoya Protocol and Food Security

12 March 2015, CGIAR Master Class, Brad Sherman

The Nagoya  Protocol, which was adopted in 2014, is an international agreement that aims to ensure that the benefits arising from the utilisation of genetic resources are shared in a fair and equitable way, including by appropriate access to genetic resources and by appropriate transfer of relevant technologies. In so doing, it also aims to contribute to the conservation of biological diversity and the sustainable use of its components.

One of the fears that was raised during the negotiations was that the Protocol would have a negative impact on the use of plant genetic resources to be used for food and agriculture. To this end, Article 8(c) of the Protocol was introduced. This provides that in the development and implementation of its access and benefit-sharing legislation or regulatory requirements, each Party shall consider the importance of genetic resources for food and agriculture and their special role for food security.

In 2014, FAO undertook a series of studies that looked at  the scope of Article 8(c). The aim of  this webinar is to draw on these studies to look at the ramifications that Article 8(c) may have for CGIAR Centers. As well as providing a background on Article 8(c), it will look at the practical ramifications that it may have for Centers in the future.

Article 8. Special Considerations

In the development and implementation of its access and benefit-sharing legislation or regulatory requirements, each Party shall:

(a) Create conditions to promote and encourage research which contributes to the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity, particularly in developing countries, including through simplified measures on access for non-commercial research purposes, taking into account the need to address a change of intent for such research;

(b) Pay due regard to cases of present or imminent emergencies that threaten or damage human, animal or plant health, as determined nationally or internationally. Parties may take into consideration the need for expeditious access to genetic resources and expeditious fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising out of the use of such genetic resources, including access to affordable treatments by those in need, especially in developing countries;

(c) Consider the importance of genetic resources for food and agriculture and their special role for food security.

 

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